Jemmy Madison!!! Happy 261st Birthday, March 16th, 2012!

Tomorrow, Friday March 16th, 2012, James Madison turns 261!

HAPPY BIRTHDAY to James Madison, Father of the Constitution and the Fourth President of the United States! Thank you, Mr. Madison, for all you did for us and our political world!!!!!!!

http://millercenter.org/president/madison

www.montpelier.org

To celebrate, I am humbled to announce that God has granted me the honor of being in an article by The Chronicle of Higher Education! I post it and it’s link below:) Praise God!

http://chronicle.com/article/A-Presidents-Impersonator/131131/

March 11, 2012

A President’s Impersonator Comes to Class

A President's Impersonator Comes to Class 1

Meghan Pietraccini

Sarah M. Everett is a senior theater major at James Madison U. and a James Madison impersonator. At 5 feet 4 inches tall and 100 pounds, she is the same size as Madison, the smallest of the presidents.

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closeA President's Impersonator Comes to Class 1

Meghan Pietraccini

Sarah M. Everett is a senior theater major at James Madison U. and a James Madison impersonator. At 5 feet 4 inches tall and 100 pounds, she is the same size as Madison, the smallest of the presidents.

By Don Troop

President James Madison died 176 years ago, but don’t be alarmed if you bump into him this week roaming the sidewalks of his namesake university in Harrisonburg, Va.

Sarah M. Everett, a theater major at James Madison University, is a James Madison impersonator who has gained attention for her portrayal of the nation’s fourth president. At 5 feet 4 inches tall, and weighing about 100 pounds, she is almost identical in size to the soft-spoken Madison.

This week, on what would have been Madison’s 261st birthday, Ms. Everett will don a three-cornered hat, a hand-tailored double-breasted coat with tails, and shoes from the period, and socialize as Madison with her fellow students and campus visitors. She’ll also wear a white wig, although Madison displayed his own hair.

“When I’m dressed as Madison, first person, I expect to be treated as Madison,” she says. “I never break character at any time when I’m dressed as James Madison, even in class.”

Ms. Everett became something of a sensation two years ago when she arrived at the university as a transfer student from Juneau, Alaska, and began appearing in her Madisonian regalia. She had initially feared she’d be humiliated by her peers. Instead, she was embraced.

When she’s in character, she says, people don’t call her Sarah. “They call me ‘Mr. Madison’ or ‘Mr. President,'” she says, or—this being college—”J. Maddy.”

Ms. Everett’s interest began as part of a high-school project and quickly evolved into a passion after an event at the president’s Montpelier estate in 2008, where she met Ralph L. Ketcham, a Syracuse University emeritus professor and Madison’s biographer. Mr. Ketcham, she says, noted her resemblance to Madison and then encouraged her to follow in the footsteps of John Douglas Hall, the statesman’s best-known impersonator.

Ms. Everett says she digested every scholarly work she could find on the man who is known as the father of the Constitution, searching for clues on how to convey his persona. “I raise Madison up from the books that I have read, and I put him on, essentially, through my costume, through my gestures, through my physical behavior,” she says. “I bring him to life as a man.”

In an e-mail, Mr. Ketcham praised Ms. Everett’s commitment and passion for her work. “She is very well informed and catches Madison’s style and language nicely (as much as we can say that two centuries later!),” he wrote. “Her audiences will get an accurate, even nuanced understanding of Madison. She would be no danger to Madison scholarship.”

She has made several paid appearances as Madison and has interned at Montpelier, where she would like to work full time after her graduation in December. This being the bicentennial of the Madison-led War of 1812, she expects to keep busy portraying him. But Ms. Everett says she is careful not to slip too far into character.

“I’ve had to learn that I can’t make my identity James Madison because I’m not James Madison,” she says. “God created me for a certain purpose in life. Part of that is interpreting Madison, but God has something else for me, too.”

HAPPY BIRTHDAY, JAMES MADISON!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

 

 

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Five November Bicentennial Events for the Presidency of James Madison!

Dear Family, Friends and Fellow Madison Enthusiasts,

It is my honor and great joy to inform you of four very exciting bicentennial
events that are coming up this week and the next.

November 1st, 1811

In the matter of the Little Belt affair of May 16th, British
minister to the United States Augustus John Foster is notified by the American
government that the United States is prepared to reach a friendly agreement on
the incident, provided that Great Britian rescinds her Orders in Council
affecting American commercial shipping. The British will not accept the American
offer of compensation, but they will present a counter offer to settle the
Chesapeake incident of June 22nd, 1807.

November 4th, 1811

In  Washington, the 12th Congress convenes. The midterm elections of 1810
have drastically altered the political alignment of both houses. The revelant
popular nationalism and pro-war sentiment have swept the “War Hawks” into
office, replacing the old generation of appeasers and peace-seekers. Among the
new Democratic-Republicans who advocate expansionism and nationalism are South
Carolina’s John C. Calhoun, William Lowndes, and Langdon Cheves; New York’s
Peter B. Porter; Kentucky’s Richard M. Johnson and Henry Clay; and Tennessee’s
Felix Grundy and John Sevier. Although the War Hawks are in a numerical
minority, they achieve great influence in the House of Representatives. Henry
Clay is selected Speaker of the House; Calhoun, Grundy and Porter gain control
of the foreign relations committee. The northwestern War Hawks will call for the
conquest of Canada, while the Southerners call for the annexation of al of
Florida.

November 5th, 1811

In his message to Congress, President James Madison calls for increased
preparations for the national defense in face of the continued British and
French harassment of American commerical shipping. This is a delivery of a
tentative war message to Congress, indicating his shift in policy:)

November 7th, 1811

In the Indiana Territory, the Indians led by Shawnee leader Tecumseh carry
out a successful surprise attack on the 1,000 man force led by Governor William
Henry Harrison. In the hard fought battle of Tippecanoe, Harrison’s men are able
to repulse the Indians despite heavy losses. After razing the Indian village,
Harrison’s troops withdraw southward to Fort Harrison. Despite the indecisive
aftermath of the battle, the frontier settlers accalim it as a great victory
over the Indians, adding to the influence of the congressional War Hawks
and serving as a prelude to the coming War of 1812. The British in
Canada withdraw their support of Tecumseh and The Prophet, and Tecumseh flees.
Nevertheless, the anti-British sentiment on the frontier has been fuled with
bellicose calls to expel the British from Canada. On December 18th, Madison will
proclaim the battle of Tippecanoe a victory that will restore peace to the
northwestern frontier.

November 25th, 1811

The Senate confirms James Monroe as Secretary of State, replacing the
incompetent Robert Smith. Monroe accepts the offer of the British to settle the
Chesapeake incident of June 22nd, 1807.

Indeed, things are picking up quick. Pretty soon, 1811 (2011) will be over,
and here comes 1812 (2012). I have heard through many different sources that in
2012, there will be many different bicentennial evetns around the Eastern part
of our country celebrating the bicentennial beginning of the War of 1812:)

I sincerely hope each of you have been well and I look forward to
reconnecting with each of you soon:)

Most Sincerely, I am Yr. Obt. Srvt., with Esteem,

Sarah Everett

President James Madison

 

“For where your treasure is, there your heart
will be also,” – Matthew 6:21

 

“Knowledge will forever govern ignorance; and a
people who mean to be their own governors must arm themselves with the power
which knowledge gives,” – James Madison

 

“Let me recommend the best medicine in the
World; a long journey, at a mild Season, thro’ a pleasant Country, in easy
stages,” – James Madison

 

“Always look forward; Look back and you will
fall over. And don’t ever quit, no matter what people will say. I started with
the firm conviction that when I came to the end, I wanted to be regretting the
things I had done, not the things I hadn’t. When you reach the top, that’s when
the climb begins,” – Michael Caine

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Sept 15th, Madison’s Wedding, and Sept. 17th, Constitution Day!

Hello, dear Family, Friends, and Fellow Madison scholars,

It is with great joy that I announce the significance of two days in the Madison annual celebrations list:)

Today is the 217th anniversary of the wedding of James and Dolley Madison:)

James Madison was 43 and Dolley Payne Todd was 26 when the two of them married in Harewood Virginia (what is now in West Virginia), at Dolley’s sister Lucy Payne Washington’s big stone home. Madison had formally courted Dolley for four months after they met in Philadelphia May of 1794. Both lived in Philadelphia at the time, Madison a member of the House of Representatives and Dolley a widow living with her mother in a boarding house. Senator Aaron Burr gave the official introductions, and for James Madison it was love a first sight. He proposed to Dolley just before the summer began and as he nursed an ailing Frenchman stuck at Montpelier, he awaited Dolley’s reply. She was sick with malaria in North Carolina over the summer, but soon Madison received her answer: yes! Their marriage would last 42 years, and within those years the development of love would be so mutual between them that it still remains a beautiful mystery to this day:)

The second annual celebration we applaud is Constitution Day, Sept. 27th, of which JMU will be honoring tomorrow and Montpelier on Saturday:) In fact, I’ll be AT Montpelier all day for this celebration! YAY!

Sept. 17th, 1787, was, as we well know, the day that the delegates from the Continental Congress came together one last time from the separate 13 states and put their names to the document in Independence Hall that has now for over 200 years become the blueprint, the foundation of our democratic-republican nation. Madison was among these men. That time in Philadelphia, four months in the summer’s excruciating heat debating and shaping a government, would go down as perhaps the most remembered of James Madison’s achievements (among many). It was his hard work and devotion in particular that won him the title years later “The Father of the Constitution” because his mind was the power house behind The Virginia Plan, the document that became the skeleton of what the Constitution, essentially. Though, in his own words, Madison would reply, “You give me a credit to which I have no claim in calling me ‘the writer of the Constitution of the United States.’ This was not, like the fabled Goddess of Wisdom, the offspring of a single brain. It ought to be regarded as the work of many heads and many hands.”
On Constitution Day, Sept. 17th, we remember those delegates in Philadelphia and recall the importance of the Constitution to our nation. I particularly celebrate James Madison and attribute in his honor that without him, we wouldn’t have our nation:) Our nation of Liberty and Learning! Thank you, Mr. Madison!
Thank you, to all those delegates who labored so hard 224 years ago! We love the United States of America!

God Bless you all and do take care!

Most Sincerely, I am Yr. Obt. Srvt. and Fellow Madisonian, with Esteem,

Sarah Everett

President James Madison

“For where your treasure is, there your heart will be also,” – Matthew 6:21

“Knowledge will forever govern ignorance; and a people who mean to be their own governors must arm themselves with the power which knowledge gives,” – James Madison

“Let me recommend the best medicine in the World; a long journey, at a mild Season, thro’ a pleasant Country, in easy stages,” – James Madison

“Always look forward; Look back and you will fall over. And don’t ever quit, no matter what people will say. I started with the firm conviction that when I came to the end, I wanted to be regretting the things I had done, not the things I hadn’t. When you reach the top, that’s when the climb begins,” – Michael Caine

 

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James Madison’s death, June 28th, 1836 – 175 years ago

Today, in 1836, our beloved James Madison passed away at the age of 85 in his study room in his home, Montpelier. Paul Jennings, Madison’s personal servant, was there at his death and gives the account, as stated in the wonderful biography of Ralph Ketcham:

The morning of June 28th, Jennings joined his master as usual, about 6am, and shaved him as he had every day for sixteen years. Sukey, as old as Madison, and his servant for nearly seventy years, brought his breakfast, and Nelly Willis, always at Montpelier at times of need, came to the sickroom to visit with her uncle as he ate. When he seemed to have difficulty swallowing, Mrs.Willis asked him what the trouble was. Jennings recalled that Madison replied, “Nothing more than a change of mind, my dear,” and then, “His head instantly dropped, and he ceased breathing as quietly as the snuff of a candle goes out.” The next day, Madison was buried at Montpelier, where his obelisk (planted many years later) now stands tall to commemorate and acknowledge his lasting legacy.

Today, as sad as this account is of dear James Madison’s death, we can nod to him in thanks for what he did for our country, his integrity, hard work, and undeniable faith in the Republic as he fought for Union, always.

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Happy Birthday to Dolley Madison, May 20th, 2011!!!!

I send this message in recognition and joyful celebration of Dolley Madison’s 243rd birthday, this Friday, May 20th!!!!

I happily applaud and bow to all of you who actively and enthusiastically devote your time and energy to learning more about Dolley and her legacy, and who notably share this knowledge to others (that especially means Ms. Catherine Allgor, those of you at The Papers of James Madison, and Montpelier!). And how wonderful to hear about Montpelier’s new exhibit about Dolley’s fashions! Congratulations! I wish I could come and see it!!!! For more information, see –

http://www.montpelier.org/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dolley_Madison

I am so happy to wish Dolley Payne Todd Madison, wife of President James Madison, a very Happy Birthday this week!!!!!

Dolley, thank you for the vivacious character, abundant love, and dancing grace that you possessed and shared to everyone around you! You completed James Madison’s life, the pearl of his love and affections, and I’ve no doubt that no matter where you are, you are smiling your warm charming smile to us here in the country Jemmy Madison helped create and you helped unite! We owe you a great deal.

Thank you, Dolley Madison and HAPPY BIRTHDAY!!!!!!

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Bicentennial of the President vs. Little Belt, May 16th, 1811

Today marks another bicentennial in the presidency of James Madison!!!! :

May 16th, 1811:

In the wake of the Guerriere-Spitfire incident of May 1st (an impressment that aroused a public outcry), Captain John Rodgers of the 44-gun American frigate President has been ordered to protect American shipping off New York harbor. The President chases and engages a vessel thought to be the British frigate Guerriere, but which turns out to be the British 20-gun corvette Little Belt. The Little Belt is disabled, with nine seamen killed and 23 wounded. American minister to Great Britain William Pinkney sets sail also around this time for the United States, leaving a diplomatic impasse between England and America.

To come: May 20th, the celebration of the 243rd birthday of James Madison’s wife, Dolley Payne Todd Madison! 🙂

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Bicentennial of James Monroe’s post in the Madison administration – April 2nd, 1811!!!

This day, two hundred years ago, President James Madison appointed James Monroe to be his new Secretary of State. James Monroe replaced the former Secretary of State, Robert Smith, who proved to be rather incompetent and did not negotiate or work well with Madison or foreign diplomats. In fact, most of the time, Madison had had to act as his own Secretary of State because of Smith’s inadequacies. James Monroe had been a long time friend of Madison’s, despite the number of times they’d campaigned against each other, including for the House of Respresentatives seat in 1788-1789, as well as the national elections for the presidency in 1809. Monroe, along with Secretary of Treasury Albert Gallatin, would prove to be Madison’s only strength in his Cabinet through the War of 1812. Let’s not forget that Dolley Madison, Madison’s wife, was also a right hand of strength for the President:) Applause for James Monroe!!! April 2nd, 1811!

For more information, please consult:

http://millercenter.org/academic/americanpresident/madison

Most Sincerely, I am Yr. Obt. Srvt.

Sarah Everett

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